Proposed secondary school curriculum…

By Andrew Mackinnon

Last updated: 9th March, 2024



Secondary schools in white countries around the world have not functioned effectively in order to beneficially prepare white secondary school students for adult life for at least four decades since the 1980s and probably much longer.

In short, the secondary school curriculums in white countries around the world are too difficult, too irrelevant and there is too much of them to be learnt by white secondary school students.

The timetable of secondary school hours in white countries around the world should be adjusted in order to serve the best interests of white secondary school students.


The hours of secondary school for students in Years 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 in secondary school should be from 8:25 am to 2:45 pm with 25 minutes for recess and 1 hour and 15 minutes for lunch, totalling 31.7 hours of secondary school per school week.


The five classes each secondary school day should be reduced in length from 55 minutes to 45 minutes, which will improve the attentiveness of secondary school students.


Students should be required to be present at secondary school from 8:25 am on each secondary school day.

The first lesson of each secondary school day should be from 9:00 am to 9:45 am.

The second lesson of each secondary school day should be from 9:50 am to 10:35 am.

Recess should be from 10:35 am to 11:00 am.

The third lesson of each secondary school day should be from 11:05 am to 11:50 am.

The fourth lesson of each secondary school day should be from 11:55 pm to 12:40 pm.

Lunch should be from 12:40 pm to 1:55 pm.

The fifth lesson of each secondary school day should be from 2:00 pm to 2:45 pm.


The purpose of increasing the duration of lunch to 1 hour and 15 minutes each secondary school day is to provide secondary school students with sufficient time each secondary school day to talk with each other and enjoy each other’s company, which is indispensable for the social development of school students of all ages as human beings in preparation for adulthood.

Communicating with other people is very important.


Obviously this mode of secondary schooling works better in the context of co-education, rather than the context of single-sex education, since co-education is the logically preferable type of education that is most conducive to the optimal development of secondary school students as human beings in preparation for adulthood.

Lunchtime during secondary schooling (as well as recess during secondary schooling and the half hour before secondary schooling commences from 8:25 am to 8:55 am) should be very closely monitored by a sufficient number of teachers in order to detect and prevent instances of bullying which can socially isolate secondary school students and can prevent them from interacting socially with other secondary school students, thereby seriously impeding their development as human beings in preparation for adulthood.

Since it is obviously in the best interests of secondary school teachers for secondary school students to be as well-behaved as possible, secondary school students who behave badly during secondary school, such as by bullying other secondary school students, including during lunchtime during secondary school, should be punished harshly to deter other secondary school students from similarly behaving badly, such as by bullying other secondary school students, by isolating these badly behaving secondary school students via detention during the final half hour of lunchtime during secondary school from 1:25 pm to 1:55 pm, for as many final half hours of lunchtime during secondary school as the teachers see fit, so that they are not permitted to speak to any other secondary school students or do anything, including write, draw, do homework, use a phone, rest their heads on their desks or sleep, in order to both punish the badly behaving secondary school students to deter other secondary school students from similarly behaving badly, such as by bullying other secondary school students, and to influence the badly behaving secondary school students to improve their behaviour in the future.

This would work very effectively to solve a myriad of behavioural problems, including bullying, currently present amongst secondary school students in secondary schools in white countries around the world, including Jewish (i.e. Edomitish) adherents of the Rothschilds-led synagogue of Satan (i.e. Satanists) who are being coached by their Jewish (i.e. Edomitish) parents to bully white secondary school students and have been for decades, which explains much of the systemic bullying problem in secondary schools in white countries around the world (as well as much of the systemic bullying problem in workplaces in white countries around the world). All of this bullying is predominantly being carried out by Jewish (i.e. Edomitish) adherents of the Rothschilds-led synagogue of Satan (i.e. Satanists).


The purpose of changing the finish time of secondary school from 3:00 pm to 2:45 pm each secondary school day is to provide secondary school students with more precious time each secondary school day after secondary school has finished to earn money by doing work such as washing cars or mowing lawns (ideally 1 hour per secondary school day), to socialise with their friends (ideally 1 hour per secondary school day) and to do their homework (ideally 1 hour per secondary school day), so that all of these activities are completed by 6:30 pm each secondary school day.



In Years 7, 8, 9 and 10 in secondary school, all students should be required to study English, Mathematics, Science, Geography and History, together with their choice of only one elective subject, such as Commerce, German, French, Industrial Arts, Home Economics, Music and Visual Arts.

The weekly curriculum in Years 7, 8, 9 and 10 in secondary school, totalling 18.75 hours per secondary school week, should be as follows:

> English – 3 x 45 minute lessons

> Mathematics – 3 x 45 minute lessons

> Science – 3 x 45 minute lessons

> History – 3 x 45 minute lessons

> Geography – 3 x 45 minute lessons

> Elective subject – 3 x 45 minute lessons

> Religious Education – 2 x 45 minute lessons

> Physical Education – 2 x 45 minute lessons

> Civic Education – 1 x 45 minute lesson

(i.e. study of the Australian government and the rights and responsibilities of Australian citizenship (half of the time); study of the machinations of the Rothschilds-led synagogue of Satan (half of the time))

> Industrial Arts (non-elective) for males / Home Economics (non-elective) for females – 1 x 55 minute lesson

> Life skills – 1 x 45 minute lesson

(including,

in Year 7,

selecting and buying an appropriate, useful bicycle, safeguarding that bicycle against theft (using both a 14 mm-outer-diameter U-lock and a 12 mm-outer-diameter cable lock),

theory of bicycle maintenance and repairs (including applying light oil sparingly to the heads of Allen-key bolts, in order to prevent corrosion of the heads of Allen-key bolts),

in Year 8,

computer skills (including touch-typing, to be practiced for 20 to 30 minutes per week for at least 12 weeks),

reverse osmosis water filtration, nutrition,

theory of physical exercise (from Sunday to Friday alternating daily between weight-training and running (e.g. running on the spot on a shock-absorbent mat)), including proper stretching before and after exercise,

money management, saving money,

in Year 9,

selecting and buying an appropriate, useful, rear-wheel-drive or four-wheel-drive or all-wheel-drive motor vehicle, safeguarding that motor vehicle against theft,

theory of automotive maintenance and repairs, involving the primary components of motor vehicles,

selecting and buying appropriate, useful tools and consumables (e.g. engine oil), safeguarding those tools and consumables against theft,

selecting and buying an appropriate, useful trailer, safeguarding that trailer against theft,

selecting and buying appropriate, useful equipment, such as a ride-on lawn mower, in order to perform work productively on one’s behalf, as an effective and efficient means of earning income, safeguarding that equipment against theft,

in Year 10,

buying land,

connecting utilities to that land (i.e. water, electricity, sewerage, telecommunications, gas),

designing a house,

building a house, using expanded polystyrene (EPS) sheets for insulation (in order to block heat outside in warm weather and retain heat inside in cool weather),

landscaping (including using grass as ground cover),

theory of household maintenance and repairs (including not cutting grass too short (in order to maintain its health and avoid killing it), cutting branches of trees back as little as possible (in order to minimise loss of vegetation), periodically painting wood that is exposed to the weather (in order to prevent water damage from morning dew, humidity and rain, as well as ultraviolet damage from the sun) and periodically painting steel that is not galvanised (in order to prevent corrosion)),

collecting rainwater and growing food)



Apart from sport in Physical Education classes for secondary school students, there should be no sport in secondary school.

Secondary school is compulsory for white citizens of white countries around the world of secondary school age.

Therefore, the amount of time that white citizens of white countries around the world of secondary school age are obligated to spend attending secondary school should be limited.

Apart from sport in Physical Education classes for secondary school students, sport in secondary school does not limit the amount of time that white citizens of white countries around the world of secondary school age are obligated to spend attending secondary school, but instead increases the amount of time that white citizens of white countries around the world of secondary school age are obligated to spend attending secondary school.

Therefore, apart from sport in Physical Education classes for secondary school students, there should be no sport in secondary school.



For secondary school students who pursue musical endeavours, such as learning and playing musical instruments and singing, rehearsals for secondary school musical groups, such as bands, orchestras and choirs, should only be held between 8:00 am and 8:55 am on school days, before secondary school commences, in order to leave lunchtimes on school days free for all secondary school students to spend socialising and networking with each other and building friendships and associations with each other as an important part of secondary school and in order to leave the time in the afternoons on school days after secondary school has finished free for secondary school students to spend as they choose, with the exception of being obligated to do homework.

On account of the time involved in rehearsals for secondary school musical groups, it is not advisable for secondary school students to participate in more than two secondary school musical groups, such as bands, orchestras and choirs, at the same time, so that the amount of time they spend in rehearsals for secondary school musical groups each week, in the mornings on school days from 8:00 am to 8:55 am, before secondary school commences, exceeds three 55-minute rehearsals on three mornings on school days from 8:00 am to 8:55 am, before secondary school commences. (Whereas bands and orchestras may typically rehearse for two mornings each week on school days from 8:00 am to 8:55 am, before secondary school commences, choirs may typically rehearse for one morning each week on a school day from 8:00 am to 8:55 am, before secondary school commences.)

Although it is beneficial for secondary school students to pursue musical endeavours and beneficial for those who hear them perform their music, these benefits do not justify secondary school students belonging to too many musical groups and committing themselves to too many rehearsals for these musical groups, so that their schedules in secondary school are placed under considerable time pressure, at a time in their young, developing lives when it is in their best interests for their schedules to be free of considerable time pressure, so that they can absorb and learn the material being presented to them for their benefit via the secondary school curriculum in an effective manner.

In addition, the time in the morning on school days from 8:25 am to 8:55 am, before secondary school commences, during which time secondary school students are typically required to attend secondary school, provides a valuable opportunity for secondary school students to spend socialising with each other, networking with each other and building friendships and associations with each other, as important parts of secondary school, or for secondary school students to simply finish homework that is due soon in the library, before secondary school commences.

Therefore, It is important for secondary school students who pursue musical endeavours, such as learning and playing musical instruments and singing, so that they are involved each week in one or more rehearsals for secondary school musical groups, such as bands, orchestras and choirs, from 8:00 am to 8:55 am on secondary school days, before secondary school commences, to be aware that they are giving up their free time every morning on a secondary school day from 8:25 am to 8:55 am, before secondary school commences, when they are otherwise involved in a rehearsal for a secondary school musical group, such as a band, orchestra or choir.

Teachers in secondary school involved in secondary school musical groups, to which secondary school students belong in their pursuit of musical endeavours, such as learning and playing musical instruments (and possibly singing), should actively challenge these secondary school students to substantiate their willingness to pursue these musical endeavours, such as learning and playing musical instruments (and possibly singing), as opposed to being forced by their parents to pursue these musical endeavours, such as learning and playing musical instruments (and possibly singing), against their will.

It is widely known that learning and playing a musical instrument (and possibly singing) increases one’s intellectual capacity, so that many parents force their children to learn and play musical instruments (and possibly sing) against their will, in order to increase their children’s intellectual capacities and thereby improve their children’s academic performances in secondary school, in order to seek to improve their children’s prospects in later, adult life.

While willingly learning and playing a musical instrument (and possibly singing) is beneficial for one’s development, by increasing one’s intellectual capacity, learning and playing a musical instrument (and possibly singing) against one’s will is harmful for one’s development, by decreasing one’s intellectual capacity in unforeseen ways.

If parents really knew how abjectly miserable they make their children by forcing them to learn and play musical instruments (and possibly sing) against their will, as well as the very real and very profound, unintended, adverse consequences of this musical slavery, such as loss of motivation for schoolwork and homework, I obviously hope that they would never force their children to learn and play musical instruments (and possibly sing) against their will.

In contrast, children willingly learning and playing only one musical instrument (and possibly singing), in order to ensure that they are not overburdened with the time and effort involved in learning and playing more than one musical instrument (and possibly singing), is obviously very beneficial for both the children and those who hear them perform their music.

(I do believe that the most exquisite musical instrument is the human voice.)

Under no circumstances should any secondary school students be forced by their secondary schools to participate compulsorily in any musical groups, such as bands, orchestras or choirs, such as secondary school students in Years 7, 8, 9 and 10 who are studying elective Music.



It is critically important to strictly limit the amount of homework assigned to students in each year of secondary school so that secondary school students are not overburdened by too much homework.

Homework is indispensable for the cognitive and intellectual development of secondary school students.  The reality is that secondary school students who do not complete their homework do not develop cognitively and intellectually to anywhere near their full potential.  The purpose of homework is for secondary students to learn by reading their assigned textbooks as directed by their teachers, to practice and improve the skills they have been learning in class by completing exercises as directed by their teachers and to study for upcoming tests and exams.

Secondary school students have the admirable responsibility of not only completing schoolwork at school but also taking schoolwork home with them and completing it at home as homework.  This responsibility should be respected by their teachers and not exploited.  The lives of secondary school students outside of secondary school hours and their time outside of secondary school hours should also be respected by strictly limiting the amount of homework that is assigned to secondary school students.



The amount of homework and study at home required of students in Years 7, 8, 9 and 10 in secondary school should not exceed the equivalent of 60 minutes of homework and study at home per school day, totalling a maximum of 5 hours of homework and study at home per school week. This is the equivalent of a maximum of 50 minutes of homework and study at home per school week for each of the six subjects that students in Years 7, 8, 9 and 10 study. Study at home for upcoming tests and exams should be required of students in Years 7, 8, 9, 10.

The purpose of limiting the amount of homework and study at home required of students in Years 7, 8, 9 and 10 in secondary school is to limit the intensity of the workload on students so that they have enough free time outside of school, homework and study at home to spend how they choose, such as by working to earn money and socialising with their friends.

Limiting the burden of homework and study at home on students in Years 7, 8, 9 and 10 in secondary school will free up their afternoons after school to work to earn money, such as by mowing lawns or washing cars, as well as to spend time with their friends socialising. This will give secondary school students an important opportunity to save for their futures and accumulate the money required to later purchase a motor vehicle, when they reach the age at which they can obtain their driver’s licence.



In Years 11 and 12 in secondary school, all students should study a total of six subjects, being English compulsorily, Mathematics compulsorily and four elective subjects chosen out of:

> science subjects (i.e. Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Physics, et cetera)

> Geography

> History

> their elective subject from Years 7, 8, 9 and 10 or a continuing subject, such as Economics for the elective subject from Years 7, 8, 9 and 10 of Commerce


There should only be one version of each subject offered for study, such as 2 Unit Mathematics, not multiple versions of each subject offered for study, such as 2 Unit Mathematics, 3 Unit Mathematics and 4 Unit Mathematics with increasing levels of difficulty.  The purpose of restricting each subject to one version is to limit the intensity of the workload on students so that they have enough free time outside of school, homework and study at home to spend how they choose, such as by working to earn money and socialising with their friends.

Australian state and territorial governments have implemented very bloated secondary school curriculums in the states and territories of Australia, which include an excessive amount of calculus in mathematics in Year 11 and Year 12 in 3 Unit Mathematics and 4 Unit Mathematics (given that fewer that 20% of secondary school students will ever use calculus in their subsequent adult lives, outside of any subsequent attendance at university and use of calculus at university), together with a substantial number of pointless or harmful books which secondary school students are required to torturously read for their study of English, instead of instruction that concentrates on developing their actual ability to speak, read and write English well, together with their associated ability to think critically and communicate clearly.


The weekly curriculum in Years 11 and 12 in secondary school, totalling 18.75 hours per secondary school week, should be as follows:

> English – 3 x 45 minute lessons

> Mathematics – 3 x 45 minute lessons

> Elective subject 1 – 3 x 45 minute lessons

> Elective subject 2 – 3 x 45 minute lessons

> Elective subject 3 – 3 x 45 minute lessons

> Elective subject 4 – 3 x 45 minute lessons

> Free study time – 5 x 45 minute lessons

> Religious education – 1 x 45 minute lesson

> Physical education – 1 x 45 minute lesson


Given that students in Years 11 and 12 in secondary school have five 45 minute lessons of free study time each secondary school week under this proposed secondary school curriculum, the amount of study at school, homework and study at home required of students in Years 11 and 12 in secondary school should not exceed the equivalent of 105 minutes of study at school, homework and study at home per school day, totalling a maximum of 8.75 hours of homework, study at home and study at school per school week.  This is the equivalent of a maximum of 87.5 minutes of study at school, homework and study at home per school week for each of the six subjects that students in Years 11 and 12 study. Study at school and study at home for upcoming tests and exams should be required of students in Years 11 and 12.

The purpose of limiting the amount of study at school, homework and study at home required of students in Years 11 and 12 in secondary school is to limit the intensity of the workload on students so that they have enough free time outside of school, study at school, homework and study at home to spend how they choose, such as by working to earn money and socialising with their friends.

Limiting the burden of study at school, homework and study at home on students in Years 11 and 12 in secondary school will free up their afternoons after school to work to earn money, such as by mowing lawns or washing cars, as well as to spend time with their friends socialising. This will give secondary school students an important opportunity to save for their futures and make a much-needed start towards accumulating the money required to later buy a house or some land, on which to build a house in which to live, so that the amount time they will need to spend renting when they get older and move out of home is reduced.



For your consideration…

School students should complete secondary school at the age of 17 years.



Postscript:

I worked very hard in secondary school. I finished Year 12 in secondary school in New South Wales in 1990 at the age of 18 years in the top 0.85% of the state of New South Wales in the Higher School Certificate (HSC) – 446th out of 54,338 candidates.  My “1990 NSW HSC Candidate Number” is 703421. I obtained a Tertiary Entrance Rank (TER) of 99.15 in the Higher School Certificate (HSC) in New South Wales in 1990.

I hold a Bachelor of Economics majoring in Accounting & Finance from Macquarie University in Sydney, New South Wales, where the rabbits roam freely.


As a result of choosing the elective subjects German, French and Music in Years 8, 9 and 10 of secondary school and therefore not studying Geography and History in Years 8, 9 and 10, I finished secondary school ignorant and uneducated.

It is difficult for any person to reach their full potential in adult life without a proper education in Geography and History in secondary school.

It was not until I reached the age of about 42 years that I had learned enough about Geography and History to feel as though I had caught up on what I had missed out on learning in Geography and History in Years 8, 9 and 10 in secondary school, as a result of my poor choice of elective subjects.

It is for these reasons that I strongly believe that the study of Geography and History should be compulsory for all secondary school students in Years 8, 9 and 10, in addition to Year 7.